Cardiac Components Can Now be Printed in 3D

Full organ printing will become a possibility thanks to the newly developed method that facilitates 3D printing collagen and cells in order to form organ components. This approach, called Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) has been developed by researchers at the Carnegie Mellon University in the Unites States of America.

Layer by layer printing of collagen in a bath support gel is involved in the newly developed technique by the researchers. Right before the application, the correct shape will thus be achieved as it will be solidified.

When it comes to organ replacement, there is a substantial demand of 3D bio printing as it show a lot of promise. Despite the demand, using collagen and living cells; which are the apt materials becomes challenging for researchers for the purpose of printing organs or organ components. Bioprinted constructs are therefore the current alternate techniques. However, they fail to deliver the accuracy and resolution required for the implants. 

According to one of the researches involved in the study, Andrew Hudson, in order for 3D printing collagen is a must have biomaterial, as it constitutes literally every single tissue in a person’s body. He further explained that the challenges faced by the researchers while attempting to 3D print collagen is its fluid state which leads to forming a puddle when printed. Thus a method to avoid the deformation has been developed by the researchers. Collagen scaffolds can be created by anyone who has access to 3D printers as this technique is compatible with such printers. Interestingly, it will be possible to create implants on the basis of the individual requirements of the patients. MRI data has been used to develop patient specific structures appropriate for individual patients so far by the team of researchers as a part of their study.

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